4: Les Mots de la Semaine: Words of the Week

It’s that time again- Les Mots de la Semaine!

petit-francais

This will be short and sweet today as it’s Antoine’s actual birthday and we are trekking to his hometown, Briançon. I say trekking because Briançon is situated in the French Alps and tonight there is a lovely timed snow storm gracing us with its presence. Which also means that if we don’t get there in time, the one tiny road cutting through the mountain might close. Here’s hoping we’ll be back by Sunday…  

But on to les mots:

1. Un Entretien an interview (for a job)

2. Les Loisirs– hobbies

3. Inculte– uncultivated, ignorant

4. Se Noyer– to drown

5. Un Losange– diamond as in the shape, whereas a diamond ring is un diamant (and NO don’t worry about if I was discussing diamond rings, I was actually realizing that I don’t know French shapes- très pathétique, I know).

And finally, here are some- Bonus B Mots:

  • Bâiller, un bâillement– to yawn, a yawn
  • Bricolage– to fix, to repair, to do-it-yourself
  • Brouillard– fog

Happy Friday!

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Enfin, Je suis employé!

I must share my happiness today because the long wait is OFFICIALLY over!! I have a job! True, it’s only a temporary one as it’s a camp, but it’s not only a source of income, but a job that I am excited about!!

I got hired to work as a counselor at American Village, a program that organizes English immersion language camps throughout France. This is a great program for Americans who want to get paid to be in France. It is a rare thing to find, and I couldn’t be happier I got it! I’ll be teaching English and art, playing and creating games, frolicking in the sun (hopefully), and who knows what else!

Today marked the start of a new chapter as the long drought of unemployment finished, and I received a tiny book of hope in the mail, aka my paperwork. At first I felt daunted by the plethora of paper (I mean come on camp- this is temporary employment after all), but as I continued to read, my stomach filled with butterflies of excitement and happiness. This camp means business. Business I’m thrilled to be a part of.

I particularly relished the program’s goals, as they discussed providing a culture of awareness and global understanding/respect. Initially I was worried when I signed up for American Village Camps, but smiled with relief to know that not only are we on the same page, but my multicultural training can not only be utilized here, but could even thrive!

It’s nice to be reminded that sometimes having patience can pan out.

Needless to say, I’m feeling good (cue Bublé) -today and about the future.

Countdown to camp tales: One month.

Happy Thursday all!!

3: Les Mots de la Semaine (Dernière): Words of the Week

I got a bit sidetracked last week preparing a surprise birthday party for Antoine- complete with a flying spaghetti monster piñata, a specialized MacGyver relay/drinking race, and TWO cakes- one with pâte à sucre learned from the wednesday before- basically a kid’s party with alcohol. Yet another reason why I’ll never be a real adult.

It was quite the event.

That being said, I completely forgot the words of the week.

So without furhter ado, here are Les Mots de la Semaine Dernière. Better late than never!
petit-francais

*Note- for now, I’m avoiding the pronunciation. I’ve had a difficult time finding certain phonetical spellings/creating my own. Bear with me as I figure this out.

1. Pourri gâté– spoiled or spoiled rotten, this can be used for kids or food

2. Honteux– ashamed or shameful

3.  (Faire) La grasse matinee– literally to make the fat morning, this means to sleep in, ex (slang): j’ai fait la grasse mat aujourd’hui (I slept in today)

4. Humecter- to moisten

5. Un sifflet, siffler– a whistle, to whistle

Bonus Mot: miettes- crumbs

Keeping it short and sweet today. Happy Monday all!

Cakes, spectacles, and jobs oh my!

Yesterday was awesome. Excuse my lack of eloquence, but there’s just no beating around the bush- it was simply awesome. Here’s why:

1. In spite of feeling lackluster and daunted by the idea of spending the afternoon speaking in French (still working on my fear of immersing myself in the language), I decided to help my friend make a birthday cake. And boy am I glad that I did. Not only was it a fun-filled afternoon with a French friend, but also an educational experience chock-full of vocabulary, and a French Baking 101 session.

You see, I learned how to make un Gâteau au Yaourt, a yogurt cake, one that French children master when they’re five. 1 point for France. Americans are lucky if they know how to make brownies from a box by age five.

But let’s talk cake. This was one of the best ways to ease into French baking, especially for me (context alert- I am the WORST baker. Seriously. I once turned boxed brownies into a brick slab, though to be fair my crazy vegan roommate told us that we could use oil as a substitute for eggs- this is FALSE).

The reason this cake is so wonderful for an American like me, or a novice French cake baker, is that all the measurements are in un pot, aka the convenience of a yogurt container.
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2: Les Mots de la Semaine: Words of the Week

It’s Friday! Which means it’s time for:petit-francais

As I said before, these are words I’ve picked up from conversation, job applications, language exchanges, newspapers, or even just listening to my surroundings. Every Friday I will post Words of the Week to reinforce my French learning, and hopefully additionally educate/entertain/interest people in random French vocabulary. So enjoy!(Note- pronunciation is a little wonky- some of it is my own pronunciation, and some of it is phonetic- so bear with me as I get a system down).

Voila, Les Mots:

1. Maladroit (mal-ah-drwa)- literally meaning ‘bad on the right’, this translates to clumsy

2. Vieillards (vyeh-yar)- old men specifically, whereas old people is personnes âgées

3. Allonger (al-on-jay)- to lengthen, however I learned this in the context of to spread or lay on something, (ex: tu es allongé sur le canapé, you are spread out on the couch, you lie down on the couch)

4. Ceinture (sɛtyr)- belt, and ceinture de sécurité is a seatbelt

5. Klaxonner (klax-oh-neh)- to honk a car horn, car horn being klaxon

6. Louper (loo-pay), Rater (rah-tey)– to miss, to miss out on, this is used more in the context of transportation or an exam, ex: j’ai raté mon vol (I missed my flight). Louper means the same thing, but is apparently more of a slang word

7. Fiche de poste (fee-sh de poh-st)- a job description

8. Postuler (poh-stu-leh) to apply for job, whereas appliquer (ah-plea-kay) is used in the context of applying a bandaid

9. Au noir (oh-nwar)- literally in black, this is similar to working under the table, working illegally

10. Guet-apens (get-ah-paw)- an ambush. Of course this is used in cowboy movies, but I heard this in the context of my boyfriend wanting to avoid a dinner that he knew would turn into a party.

Happy Friday and Happy Valentines Day! I know it’s an overly commercialized holiday, but I personally enjoy an excuse for creativity, candy, and letting the people in my life know I care!  

Sunday Marché: Hello again old friend

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Dear Marché,

It’s been a while. I’ve missed you old friend. You bring back such sweet memories.

Memories of my first time in this foreign land, when I was a child both intimidated and intrigued by things outside of my element. So much has changed, and yet so much has stayed the same.

The first time my mother wove us through your crowds of interesting people, my nostrils filled with your array of new smells, and my ears submerged in sounds of French. You embraced my family into your welcome arms; you provided that first space where I felt I belonged in this new unknown place.

And as I walked once again among patterned cloths blowing in the wind, as fruits and flowers sprung to life in the sunlight, I thought of you. As smells of strong cheese, old diesel trucks, and rotisserie chickens unleashed memories of my mother’s market cooking, of new-found independence, and youthful exploratory boldness, I smiled. 

With mud on my hands from fresh spinach, winter sun warming my cheeks, and my ears once again wrapped up in sounds of French, I became entranced by the visual feast you displayed. A painters dream unveiled before me in colors, shapes, and patters, both foreign and familiar.

So I wanted to say thank you Marché. For the reminders of my wonderful, fortunate past, and for reminding me that I live in an incredible place- that I live in France. 

Thank you for letting me be in this moment, reminding me to enjoy the simple things in life- like fresh food, and sunlit colors, fond memories, and stopping to feel the moment, in a space that reminds me of, and almost feels like, home.

Always with love,

Anna

Les Mots de la Semaine: Words of the Week

In an effort to keep up with my resolution of being more proactive with my French comprehension, I’ve started learning a word a day. Whether it’s from conversation, job applications, language exchanges, newspapers, or even just overhearing, I’ve been tuning into my surroundings, and capturing vocabulary by documenting new words in a notebook or my phone. And in an effort to further reinforce my French learning (and educate/entertain/interest people in random French vocabulary), I’ve decided that every Friday I shall post the Words of the Week- just a minimum of 5 words, their pronunciation, and meaning and/or context. (Note- pronunciation is a little wonky- some of it is my own pronunciation, and some of it is phonetic- so bear with me as I get a system down).

So Voilà- I present the first installment of:

petit-francais

Here are Les Mots (2 weeks worth since I technically started this last week):

1. Bête de scène (bet də sɛN) literally beast of the stage- this a great performer, some one who has excellent stage presence, or who comes alive on the stage

2. Aquarelles (ah-kwah-rehL)- watercolors, enough said

3.Croquer (cro-kay)- to bite, hence dry cat food being called croquettes (cro-keT)

4. Bénédiction (bene-dikt-cion)- a god send, aka something of great use and usually provides some sort of wonderful help (ex: ce petit vide est une bénédiction; this tiny vacuum is a godsend)

5. Rayures (rɛjyr) stripes, easy peasy

6.  Une pelle (pɛl), Pelleter (pɛl-tay) a shovel, to shovel (ex: Je pellette la neige avec ma pelle; I shovel the snow with my shovel) 

7.  Pleuvioter (plø-vjɔ-te)- sprinkling, drizzling, or raining lightly (had to go with fancy phonetics here; I recommend listening to this word on google translate)

8.Séance- unlike the spooky American usage for summoning of the dead, this means session or performance depending on the context

9. Encadrement (jeunesse)- supervision or coaching (Note: this is used in context of working with kids/teens, ex: encadrement de jeunesse, otherwise it apparently means frame. Also recommend listening to this word on google translate)

10. Animateur (jeunesse) (anee-ma-tour)– facilitator, or youth worker, however animateur pour enfants means children’s entertainer

Bonus: Faux Amis Warning! Persévérant = persistent

Happy Friday!

On being broke and unemployed in France

When my TAPIF program ended 8 months ago, I looked ahead at my unemployment with wide eyes. I had a bit of savings left, a whole summer in Europe, and the world as my oyster.

…Until that oyster turned on me. A year after submitting my visa paperwork, and 8 months of waiting for the prefecture to grant me the right to work, and I could no longer deny it- Je suis a sec. I’m dry, or as we say in the States, I’m broke.

True, at times, being unemployed had its perks. I had the freedom, and flexibility (and privilege), to paint, to travel, to create my own schedule, to launch my website, take care of random tasks, wander the streets of Grenoble, and catch up on far too many American series. I was lucky to have a savings to fall back on. I lived like retirees- sitting in the park in the middle of the day; enjoying the sun as it warmed my skin, and smiling at the elderly women in their fancy coats. (I sound like an old bachelor). I verged ever so slightly on crazy catladydom as I snuggled up with my soft Sasquatch, and took far too many cat pictures. I read more. I cooked more. I did some yoga and generally failed at inner peace. But I also lived the life of a retiree- at 25– and there was something unsettling about that. Continue reading