The Art of NOT Speaking French

Allow me to illustrate...

Allow me to illustrate…

As I’ve spent time talking, discussing and laughing with people from all over the world, I’ve come to the realization that English isn’t a very lively language- in terms of not speaking. We are seriously lacking in the ways of nonverbal communication- the various eye rolls, the noises, the hand gestures…we just aren’t as equipped as our European counterparts.

It’s amazing that one can communicate so much with so little effort. And boy do the French love that! They are the kings of having some sort of guteral noise for everything. Every so often you will witness a “mwah!” hand kiss to signify perfection or hear tongue tisking (which to us would seem patronizing) to let you know that you are incorrect. Be warned that our circular motion for crazy is their circular motion for smart and there is more than one way to flick some one off.

Here are a few of my favorites:

Mes Couilles (a.k.a. Bullshit):

Pull down the eyelid to signify "That's some bull!"

Pull down the eyelid to signify “That’s some bull!”

If some one is spewing a load of crap, or you just don’t believe what they’re saying, you can give them Mes Cuilles. Literally translating to “my balls” this is a very slang way of saying “That’s some bull!” All you have to do is take your pointer finger and pull down the bottom part of your eyelid. Simple and yet so satisfying.

Saoul (pronounced like sou- a.k.a. drunk):

Nose is drowning in the alcohol

Nose is drowning in the alcohol

When someone has had a bit too much to drink, this hand movement is quite…well handy. Simply hold your hand in a loose fist and move it back and fourth (as if your twisting an imaginary cork at the end of your nose). Apparently this comes from the French saying “Il a un verre dans le nez” (he has a glass on his nose), but is often accompanied with the slang of saol or bourré (sou or boo-rey).

The Gallic Shrug:

P1030249

Bof!

Quite popular among my students, the Gallic Shrug is a common way to signify “I doubt it”, “I don’t know”, or “Not my fault”. It is slightly more complicated than the others as it involves sticking out your lower lip, raising your eyebrows and shoulders, and occasionally holding up your hands. Often this is accompanied by the ever so common “Bof!” sound to signify utter annoyance.

The too good/too intense/too much epic hand shake:

P1030246-2

Oh la la!

One of my absolute favorites. Using either the right or left hand, shake it loosely and emphatically back and fourth. I have witnessed this for things being too expensive, too intense or crazy, when something is exciting, or my personal favorite- when food is really good.This is quite a versatile gesture as well as one of the only clear ways Frenchies display their enthusiasm.

Amazingly enough this only skims the surface of the multitude of nonverbal communication common among the French- I didn’t even get in to the noises made! But it sparks an intrigue in my ever growing fascination with language- to think about how we communicate with one another and how subtly or not so subtly it varies from region to region.

But for those of you that are striving to be French Fakers, there is always this Amusing way to communicate in French without knowing the language video for your education and enjoyment.

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