A Day in the Life of a Teaching Assistant

After today’s frustrating (but some how still semi-successful) lesson, I thought I should provide a small window into the life of a teaching assistant.

Every day, every class and every teacher brings a new experience- especially when you work with 12 different teachers at 2 different schools with 12 varying class by class numbers and schedules. While some days it’s quite refreshing to have variety, other days it’s down right frustrating to have inconsistency. Take last week, when I discovered that I would be grading a student (which we’re actually not allowed to do) for his Mock Bac (or as the French call it, the Bac Blanc) 15 minutes before actually doing so. No prior explanation from the teacher, no down low of the French grading system, just instructions in my mailbox.

My 15 minute break consisted of google translating Degrés 1-4 and typing my own English rubric of what each category actually meant. All things considered, the Mock Bac went pretty well- it was the aftermath where I suffered. I took the rubric back to my desk, equipped with my notes and google translate and attempted to number each category. I don’t even like grading in the U.S. (and luckily as an elementary art teacher I don’t really have to- if you try, you pass)! But to tackle a foreign system and write an evaluation in a foreign language was quite the daunting task to say the least. I finally broke down and sought text advice from a native (Antoine). Luckily he responded in time. “33/40 is very good. Basically: under 10 is miserable, between 10 and 20 is under average, 20-30 is average to good, 30-40 is good to excellent!” I nervously turned in the final results, hoping that I didn’t tamper with some student’s esteem. 

Today was not much different. After pestering the teacher all week about his expectations, I was surprised to find nothing in my mail box prior to class. Each teacher varies with their agenda- some let me plan my own lessons, others provide me with specific frameworks, and then there are those that have it all planned out. This particular teacher usually wants me to follow his specific (and boring) curriculum with no personal touches of my own. I’m happy to comply- when there is a lesson in the mail box! After receiving nothing, I fell back on my go to lesson of speed dating. I waited 15 minutes for Group #1 to show- nothing. So after deciding that maybe I’d misunderstood something, I headed for the exit only to run into three of my students. Three out of nine. The confusion went a little something like this:

“Oh. Hi. Are you guys with me today?”

“Bah…oui!”

-Confused Stares-

“Well where are the others?”

“Avec Monsieur.”

“Really? Are they coming?”

“Non.”

“Did he give you anything to work on?”

“Non.”

“Do you have anything you want to work on with me?”

-Confused whispering-

“Bahhh…maybeee?”

-Sigh-

“Ok. Let’s go. We’ll figure something out.”

I was furious. That they were so late. That I was so out of the loop. That the class had completely changed. That I had nothing prepared as speeding dating with three was a no go, but ultimately that this was a class I was responsible for without having a say in what happens. My anger was getting me nowhere, so I decided to improvise and use the knowledge I had of preparing for the Bac. We covered some helpful reviews of summarizing texts and articulating opinions. Fortunately I came prepared and rewarded them at the end with worksheets of dating vocabulary. At least they left laughing.

These experiences reminded me of what it takes to be a teacher- especially when you’re a teaching assistant.

  • Be patient
  • Be flexible
  • Be ready to improvise and think quickly on your feet
  • And come equipped with a Plan B because you never know when you’ll be out of the loop
  • But also- don’t forget to find the humor- if you’re miserable, they’re miserable…which in turn makes you even more miserable. If you can leave a frustrating situation laughing, your off to a good start.
Advertisements